There is an intermediate group of garnets in the pyrope- aimandine series. It is a deep pink or pinkish-red color (known as rhododendron pink) and is called rhodolite, from the Greek rhodon, “rose,” and lithos, “stone.” Rhodolile is a sub variety of pyrope-almandine characterized by its particular color.

Appearance The pinkish-red color is its main characteristic. The gems have good transparency and are almost always faceted, generally receiving a mixed, roughly oval or round cut. As always with transparent garnets, the luster in strong.

Distinctive features The color, luster and single refraction typical of garnets paint quite a clear picture. The stone is not, of course, pleochroic. The refractive index varies from 1.755 to 1.765 and the density from 3.74 to 3.94 g/cm3—a very limited range. Rhodolite is distinguished from corundum of a similar color by its lack of pleochroism and the fact that it does not fluoresce in bright light, and from rubellite by its lack of pleochroism, greater luster, and absence of the marked birefringence of tourmaline, which is even visible with a lens. its physical properties have to be measured, however, to distinguish it from spinel.

Occurrence Rhodolite is found in the United Staten, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, and Sri Lanka. it is not common.

Value Of the reddish garnets, it is in greater demand and therefore more valuable than pyrope and almandine.

Simulants and synthetics lt is neither imitated, nor produced synthetically.